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IrishGenealogy.ie

   Two weeks ago I wrote about the Irish Family History Foundation and their pay-per-view website for finding church records.  I mentioned that the records for Kerry and western Cork, as well as Carlow and Dublin City are available at  IrishGenealogy.ie.  In 2010 the National Library decided to make the records for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Kerry available to the public.  Prior to 2010, a search of the microfilms for Kerry required a letter of permission from the Bishop.   Shortly after that, the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht created a database and made the records available, along with those for the diocese of Cork and Ross, Carlow and Dublin City...for free.   If you ancestor came from one of these areas, begin by searching for them by name.  The results page allows you to filter the results by the type of record, diocese (then parish) and timeframe.  It also allows you to put in a second name (such as the mother’s maiden name).  Be aware that the name search will give a result for the name appearing in any field.  Like the Irish Family History Foundation site, you get a transcription of the record.

Before you search the database, check to make sure that the records for the parish and time your ancestor lived are available.  

   Just over a year ago, the IrishGenealogy.ie site was relaunched.  What was added to the IrishGenealogy site were links to free records from other repositories in Ireland and abroad, including:

     1901/1911 Census records (National Archives)

     Tithe Applotments (National Archives)

     Soldier’s Wills from World War I and South African Wars
          (National Archives)

     Griffith’s Valuations (AskAbout Ireland)

     Ireland - Australia Transportation database (PRONI)

     Military Archives (1913-1921) (Bureau of Military History)

     Ellis Island

     Castle Garden

     National Photographic Archive from the National Library

         of Ireland 

   A general search from the Home page will search all of these records at one time saving you the time of searching each of the databases individually.  My experience with the database  is that it is looking for an exact match, so you might will need to check spelling variants.  

   The site also provides a series of articles on starting your Irish research and links to additional websites.  

   Happy Hunting!


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© Donna M. Moughty 2007- 2013